Parkinson’s Disease/DBS

Dinesh Patel Bangkok

DBS Patient

“I would like to place on record my deepest sense of gratitude to Dr.Paresh Doshi & his entire team at Jaslok Hospital & Research Center, Mumbai. I was successfully operated upon by Dr. Paresh Doshi for Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery on 12th October.

 

I have been suffering from Parkinson’s disease for past 7 years with dystonia, dyskinesia & depression. I am happy to report that, I have been able to reclaim my life after the operation with reduction in depression, dystonia & dyskinesia.

 

I would also like to thank Mrs. Bharati Karkera & Dr. Shabana Shaikh for their support, encouragement, patience & good nature which helped me tremendously post-surgery. Dr. Paresh Doshi & his team were always approachable, helpful & patient with all our queries.

 

I can’t appreciate & recommend the work done by Dr. Paresh Doshi enough. Please carry on your good work.

I would like to thank entire staff of 11th Floor of the hospital for rendering good service during my stay.

 

Regards,

Dinesh Patel

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Baijnath Sharma

Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery(DBS)

We Sharma family (Mr. Baijnath Sharma) thanks, Jaslok Hospital and particularly Dr. Paresh Doshi for the successful carrying out superspecial Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery(DBS) of my father for Parkinson’s disease.

It was a dream for us to see my father (Mr. Baijnath Sharma) standing back tall and leading back to normal life. My father (Mr. Baijnath Sharma) was suffering from Parkinson’s disease from last 18 years. Life became as punishment for him and he gave up the willingness to live. The disease was in last stage with great weakness. Suddenly miracle happened and we read about the article of successful surgery of Mrs. Mohini Kapur in Jaslok which was first successful dual pacemaker surgery in India.  This gave us the hope that my father certainly can lead normal life again. I telephoned to Dr. Paresh Doshi and finally on 18th August 2008 the surgery was done. After getting it over the violent tremors my father was amused, as he could not believe it. Now he can lead the normal life and the smile we were searching is back on his face.

Tears were rolling down from his eyes and he was thanking God & Dr.Paresh Doshi. He told me that Dr. Doshi has come as a God to his life to rescue from all the pain he has suffered from last so many years.

One again on behalf of my father and my entire family members I would give thanks to Jaslok Hospital management.  Dr.Paresh Doshi and his entire team, staff for giving back new life to my father.

God bless you all & continued all your good work to bring smile back on face that are suffering from Parkinson’s disease and have lost the hope to live a normal life.

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Sitaram Shetty

DBS Surgery

Should I undergo DBS Surgery? and Whom should I trust for giving me the best result, if I undergo this surgery?

Where the two most important questions I was thinking for a long time before I could come to some fixed decision – meanwhile I just ended up wasting years which adversely affected the severity of Parkinson’s disease and the cost of Surgery.

It was Dr.Paresh Doshi whose published success record motivated me to approach him with a hope that Yes I can be cured.
Dr. Paresh Doshi & his team really helped me understand how this surgery would benefit me and what results I can expect out of it, which was not made clear to me from other Surgeons whom I had visited earlier.

Throughout the surgery and the stay in the hospital I was given very warm treatment, and never ever got a feeling that I underwent such a big surgery. Post-surgery as my neurostimulator was activated I could see the positive outputs of the surgery and those could just bring tears of happiness to my eyes. I have lost my life’s 10-12 years struggling to live an independent life, but the improvement what this surgery is showing I feel I could cover for those 10-12 years now not just by living this life but enjoying every bit of it.

My sincere thanks to Dr. Paresh Doshi, Sister Bharati, Dr.Dilraj & Dr.Atul for this new life.

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K.J Gianchandani

DBS Surgery

My wife Renu K Gianchandani age of 73, has been successfully operated for DBS surgery by Dr. Paresh Doshi at Jaslok Hospital on 10th Nov 2016. Now her Parkinson’s disease side effects are under control, she is happy, jolly, moves around, clear speech, normal limb movements. Many Parkinson’s advanced disease patients are not aware of DBS, who are staying in Gujrat.

Jaslok Hospital should put up advertisement that doctor talks to patient during DBS Operation. Jaslok Hospital Doctors, paramedics, support staff were treating Renu very well for early recovery. This Hospital is very neat, clean, good housekeeping, Superior quality of linen & excellent food for patients. Quality of food on the 1st floor for patient’s attendant needs improvement. Our Regards & Best wishes to Dr. Paresh Doshi, Bharti sister & others.

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Katy Merchant's

Parkinson’s Disease

MY FACE-OFF WITH PARKINSON’S

Speed was very important in my life. With a million things to do in one day – my work as a researcher at a leading Market Research agency plus growing children and a vibrant family life, I wished the day had more than 24 hours. There was just this much time to finish the day’s cooking for the family or to look after a sick relative or to entertain friends.

Naturally, everything had to be done FAST! Fast writing, fast-talking, even fast walking. Then, one day, I was at an industry presentation of a big media event, and suddenly, the lights went OFF in my life. I found I couldn’t move or talk fast. The words slurred and the memory failed. It was just one episode and I thought nothing of it. But then, I found that my hand refused to write and the letters become smaller and smaller across the page, but I still insisted on writing. There was a constant feeling of loss of balance and I even fell a couple of times if I tried to walk fast. Suddenly, speed was not something under my control and I knew I had to see a doctor. I knew it wasn’t the turf for a G.P. so I met a neurophysician. That was probably the one thing I did right in my life.

Dr. Sarosh Katrak diagnosed my condition as the start of Parkinson’s Disease. I was 56 years old then and because cancer ran in the family I always felt that I would one day have to battle with the carcinoma of some body part. But Parkinson’s? I knew about it as some vague illness which strikes the elderly people and that they shake a lot. When Dr. Katrak said “Parkinson’s,” the ground literally slid from under my feet. How in hell did I get this one? What did I do wrong? What is to be done now? My head buzzed with all kinds of questions for which I had no answers. I felt no different than before, so what was this sickness?

I started reading up about Parkinson’s but it was so scary since I had none of the symptoms as yet. I stopped reading the sorry case-histories because I found myself warily looking out for every goddamned symptom in me. For the next 7-8 years, I let go the fast-lane to some extent but still worked and had a full life. The Parkinson dose of dopamin kept increasing through these years until I was taking the drugs every three hours and around 12 tablets a day. Except for that, life did not change much and I was quite comfortable if one can be so, with my Parkinson’s. Yes, slowly but
surely, it was uncomfortable to be without drugs, and I would be low with energy but it didn’t matter; I accepted that.

Then two years ago, life changed – for the worse. Now the condition became a bogey. And a bogey with a terrible ghoulish face. I had retired by then and started lecturing at MBA campuses. In spite of my medication, writing on the blackboard became difficult. In the middle of a four-hour lecture, the 10-minute tea-break concided with my cramps. The doctors called it dystonia in the feet. Dr. Sarosh Kotrak told me to put my toes against the wall and push, but it didn’t help.

Over the months, it was a case of “catch-me-if-you-can”. How much could I do between the episodes of low energy/tremors pre-drug or dystonia post-drug. The “normal” on – time became shorter and shorter and I became desperate to continue with life as I knew it. I dreaded sitting around but perforce, try as I might, I could do nothing else.

The nightmare became worse despite modified drug schedules and the introduction of new drugs.

By mid-July 2005 I knew I’d had it! By this time, I was having terribly painful cramps in the toes of both my feet. Each episode would last for 45 minutes and I would write in pain, while my husband put all his weight of 75 kgs on the bent toes in order to straighten them and ease the pain.

Though I had stopped reading about Parkinson’s patients, being a researcher, I had always kept in touch with the medical developments on the sickness. As early as 2003, I had met Dr. Paresh Doshi and knew about his surgical innovations. Mentally, I was not ready then for the surgery.

Now it was time to consider it. The odds were against me anyway. If I were to continue as I was, I knew I would get worse. Dr. Doshi informed me about some basic facts:

(a) The operation was not a cure for Parkinson’s; this meant that I would deteriorate despite the surgery; the disease would continue to progress but, hopefully, at a slower rate.
(b) He did not promise me a rose-garden; if the disease had progressed to a certain level he could, maybe, improve the condition to a plausible extent but he did not assure me of total normalcy.
(c) Reading up on the net showed me the hazards of surgery which could make for less optimism, what with the risk of paralysis, to speech defects, etc.

Then, why in heavens do the operation at all!? Why spend so much money? What does the patient get in return? Talking to relatives and friends helped the least. Only my husband and children were for the operation because they saw how miserable I was. For others, it was a case of “you’re f*?!-ing up your brains, Katy. Please be careful and don’t take the risk.”

For me, the logic went differently: Can I continue with my condition, especially when it gets worse? The answer was an emphatic, “No, I’d rather die!” At the worst, if something goes wrong with the surgery, I felt I would live with myself because I’d have the solace of knowing that I tried to improve my condition and not just give up.

Once the decision was made there was no sense in “getting ready for the operation”. Paresh said this was October 2005-beginning but I could come in for surgery anytime by December or early 2006.

Go through this torture for three more months? Not me. I wanted this phase of my life to get over quickly. There was an article on the surgery in Reader’s Digest some time ago. It described exactly what the patient undergoes.

So the operation was fixed for 10th October 2005 – within two weeks of my meeting Dr. Doshi and Dr. Mohit Bhat, the neurophysician, and Dr. Neeraj Chhaya, who formed the core team. I called them “The Holy Trinity”. Neeraj looked after my hassles with having a video clip made of the pre-surgery condition and gave me useful tips on how to co-operate during the surgery when I was to be kept conscious for the procedure. Mohit candidly told me that change of medication without surgery might provide relief initially but, in the long run, I would be back to Square One. Paresh was confidence incarnated.

The important thing about the team was the there was so much concern for the patient. I don’t know how they managed the time in between surgery, OPD, and consultation, but I never felt that the meetings with me were rushed. It was one of the most important criteria for me to go ahead with such dedicated people.

What can I say about the actual surgical procedure? It is important for the patient to be conscious and to have their wits about them. Fortunately, I had enough exposure on the net and was mentally prepared with the nitty-gritties. The team’s caring helped a lot at the rough patches.

I admit it could be quite daunting if you go into this kind of surgery with your eyes closed. For me, it was a lifetime experience of a combination of modern medical technology and patient care.

It has been now nearly four months since the operation. I have begun to pick up the threads of my life again. I commute to and fro Mumbai – Pune for my monthly sessions of lectures. It is an eight-hour day of work. In between, I am free to socialize and lead a peaceful family life. I admit there are periods of low energy and slight tremors but that is a small irritation compared to the terrible spasms 3-4 times a day combined with total rigidity which was the face of dystonia after eight years of Parkinson’s Disease.

Katy Merchant
katy_merchant@vsnl.net

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